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  • One of every two men and one of every three women will get cancer in their lifetimes.
  • There are more than 120 types of brain tumors. The most common ones are: Meningiomas (34%), Gliomas (30%), Glioblastomas (17%), Astrocytomas (7%), Nerve sheath tumors [such as acoustic neuromas] (9%), Pituitary tumors (13%), Lymphomas (2%), Oligodendrogliomas (2%), Medulloblastomas/embryonal/primitive tumors (1%).
  • Fewer than 5% of adults diagnosed with cancer will participate in a clinical trial.
  • In 2010 it is estimated more than 688,096 people in the United States were living with a diagnosed primary brain or central nervous system tumor (138,054 persons with a malignant tumor, more than 550,042 persons with a non-malignant tumor).
  • Lifetime Brain Cancer Risk: Men have a 0.66% lifetime risk of being diagnosed with a primary malignant brain tumor and a 0.50% chance of dying from a brain tumor. Women have a 0.54% lifetime risk of being diagnosed with a primary malignant brain tumor and a 0.41% chance of dying from a brain tumor.
  • Metastatic brain tumors have the greatest incidence rate, with breast, lung and melanoma being the most common cancers to metastisize to the brain.
  • The 5 year relative survival rate following diagnosis of a primary malignant brain tumor, excluding lymphoma, is 32.7% for men and 31.6% for women. Here's a breakdown by age: Age 0-19 years: 63.1%, Age 20-44 years: 50.4%, Age 45-64 years: 14.2%, Age 65 or older: 4.9%
  • Primary brain tumors (those that begin in the brain) occur in people of all ages, but they are statistically more frequent in children and older adults. Metastatic brain tumors (those that begin as a cancer elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain) are more common in adults than children.
  • Brain tumors are the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children under age 20 (leukemia is the first), the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in males ages 20-39 (leukemia is the first), and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in females ages 20-39.
  • Benign tumors usually grow more slowly and are typically more easily removed. Malignant tumors tend to grow and spread quickly, and are not easily removed. Over time, some benign brain tumors may become malignant.
  • Every day, around 500 people will receive a brain tumor diagnosis.
  • Primary malignant brain tumors tend to affect more men than women. Benign brain tumors affect more women than men.
  • There are over 100 types of cancer, and any part of the body can be affected.
  • Approximately 15% of all cancers worldwide are due to infections. Undeveloped countries have a higher rate of cancers due to infection (26%) than in developed countries (8%).
  • Cancer rates are higher for whites and blacks than for Asians/Pacific Islanders.
  • About 20% to 40% of patients with other types of cancer will have it spread to the brain. The most common cancers that spread to the brain are lung, breast, unknown primary, melanoma, and colon cancers.
  • Every day 9 children in the United States are diagnosed with a brain tumor.
  • Approximately 5-10 percent of cancers are hereditary.
  • The most common cancer (and leading cause of death) in women globally is breast cancer, with an estimated 1.4 million new cases diagnosed in 2008.
  • Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death from childhood cancer.
  • Pediatric brain tumors are different from those in adults and are often treated differently.
  • 1 in 330 children in the United States will develop cancer by age 20.
  • Those who sleep less than six hours a night are more likely to develop colon cancer than those who sleep more.
  • 1 child out of 5 who is diagnosed with cancer dies.
  • About 70% of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle-income countries.
  • More than 30% of cancer could be prevented, mainly by not using tobacco, having a healthy diet, being physically active and moderating the use of alcohol. In developing countries up to 20% of cancer deaths could be prevented by immunization against the infection of HBV and HPV.
  • In 2012 there were approximately 13.7 million Americans with a history of cancer alive.
  • About 77 percent of all cancers are diagnosed in people 55-years or older.
  • Cancer kills almost 1,600 Americans a day.
  • Childhood cancers account for 1 percent of all new cancer diagnoses.
  • Cancer is the second leading cause of death in children (Accidents are number one)
  • Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of cancer in the world causing 22% of cancer deaths. The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2013 174,100 cancer deaths will be caused by tobacco use.
  • The most common cancers among men are: prostate, lung, and colorectal (colon) cancer.
  • The most common cancers among women are: breast, lung, and colorectal cancer.
  • In 2008, cancer accounted for 13% of all deaths worldwide.
  • The word “cancer” is related to the Greek word “crab”, because the way it spreads looks similar to a crab.
  • In the United States, cancer is the second leading cause of death, responsible for 1 in 4 deaths.
  • Cancer patients have twice the risk of suicide than the general population.
  • The National Cancer Institute estimates that approximately 12 million Americans with a history of cancer were alive in January 2008.
  • The 5-year relative survival rate for female breast cancer patients has improved from 63% in the early 1960s to 90% today.
  • We may spend 3-5 times the amount of research money per patient on most adult cancer cases than we do on children with cancer.
  • Skin cancer is the most common cancer. Reducing exposure to ultraviolet radiation decreases the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer. UV radiation comes from the sun, tanning booths and sunlamps.
  • In 2008, the overall cost of cancer was an estimated $228.1 billion, including $93.2 billion in direct medical costs.
  • Cancer is the number one disease killer of children in America - more than Cystic Fibrosis, Muscular Dystrophy, Asthma and AIDS combined.
  • The majority of primary tumors (34%) are located within the meninges, followed by those located within the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes of the brain (22%).
  • Approximately 4,200 children younger than age 20 will be diagnosed with primary brain tumors in 2012.
  • Lung, breast, prostate and colon cancers have the highest number of clinical trials devoted to them – more than 40 percent of all clinical trials.
  • Researchers believe that more than half of all cancers and cancer deaths are potentially preventable.

Note: The information provided on this website was not written by a doctor or cancer specialist, so in all cases you should consult your own doctor about diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment.

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